For Your Visit

Writing a care plan at a lactation home visitAnswers to commonly asked questions, info and what to expect

Filling out these forms ahead of time saves time during the visit.
HIPAA form: do not print. This is for your information.
Consent form: must be filled out and signed completely. HIPAA consent is part of the consent form.

Insurance: I am a preferred provider with Aetna! I will do the billing for you, and Aetna covers up to 6 visits in your home. If you don’t have Aetna, it is a good idea to call your insurance ahead of time to ask whether they cover lactation and what crazy rules they have. You may need to ask your HCP for a referral. I will provide you with a Superbill with all of the right codes so you can submit it to your insurance to get reimbursed.

Many insurance companies are trying to evade the ACA by only covering “licensed” IBCLCs. Please ask your insurance what type of lactation consultants they cover. I am an IBCLC, the highest standard of lactation support — but Washington State does not yet license IBCLCs. We are working on it!

Fees

Please contact me regarding the fee structure.

A few facts about our consultation:

  • It is my business to go into homes of new families. I am accustomed to messy houses, parents who haven’t bathed, and dishes in the sink. Don’t clean up on my account (although I’m deeply grateful if someone empties the litter box). Dogs and I tend to like each other, but, if you have a nervous dog, please secure it ahead of time. Dogs can be very protective of their new sibling and have been known to react strongly to visitors.
  • If the baby absolutely cannot wait to eat right before I arrive, please call or text me to let me know. If you need me to watch the baby eat, and the baby is full, we might need to reschedule.
  • I will do a thorough medical background intake during our visit.
  • I normally weigh the baby before and after a feed. It’s ideal if the baby is dressed only in a diaper and wrapped in a blanket when I get there. I like to see baby skin to skin, plus, it will make weighing baby so much simpler.
  • We’ll go over lots of background questions and give you plenty of time to get your questions answered.
  • If you are comfortable doing so, please wear a bra or tank top you can easily slip off or down to your waist, with a shirt or sweatshirt that zips or buttons. If you are not comfortable with this much bare skin, please wear whatever clothing you wish. At minimum, I will need to be able to see your nipple and any other affected area. When babies nurse in a skin-to-skin situation, it triggers the mother and baby’s innate reflexes and enhances breastfeeding success.
  • While it is usually necessary for me to touch you during my work, if you become uncomfortable at any time you need only let me know and I will stop immediately. I will ask your permission prior to touching you or your baby and will check with you frequently to make sure you are comfortable. At the same time, I will be sitting very close to you and touching you. You are in charge of your body and your space! Let me know about your comfort zone.
  • It’s great if your partner is present during the visit. Your partner will have a different perspective than you do and will be able to provide me with different information. He or she will be with you night and day – they are your best breastfeeding supporters! If he or she is not able to be there, it is fine.
  • I will send you a written plan via email within 24-48 hours of our visit.
    I will fax a report to your health care provider(s) within 24-48 hours of our visit.
    You should feel free to call, text or email me for follow up. If you would like, I am really happy to do follow up visits to make sure the situation continues to improve.

If you have any other questions prior to my visit, please let me know.

Save

Save

Inclusive Practice